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Bias is a prejudice toward one thing, person, or group compared with another. Bias is part of human evolutionary wiring designed to originally keep us safe and secure in unknown and harmful environments. However, while the world has evolved some of our biases – conscious or unconscious – have not, and thus can result in harmful perspectives, decisions, and actions toward individuals and organizations.

Examples

How Diversity Makes Teams More Innovative

Hard data proves that diversity leads to better, more creative ideas. Are diverse companies really more innovative? Rocío Lorenzo and…

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Bias and pay

How one individual's experience changed the nation. In the late 1970s, Goodyear hired Lilly Ledbetter to work as a supervisor…

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How to talk (and listen) to transgender people

Gender should be the least remarkable thing about someone, but transgender people are still too often misunderstood. To help those…

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How to get serious about diversity and inclusion in the workplace

Imagine a workplace where people of all colors and races are able to climb every rung of the corporate ladder…

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3 ways to be a better ally in the workplace

We're taught to believe that hard work and dedication will lead to success, but that's not always the case. Gender,…

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How to keep human bias out of AI

Artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms make important decisions about you all the time -- like how much you should pay for…

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3 ways to spot a bad statistic

Sometimes it's hard to know what statistics are worthy of trust. But we shouldn't count out stats altogether. Instead, we…

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Practical Guidance

The difference between being not racist and antiracist

There is no such thing as being "not racist," says author and historian Ibram X. Kendi. In this vital conversation, he defines the transformative concept of antiracism to help us more clearly recognize, take responsibility for and reject prejudices in our public policies, workplaces and personal beliefs. Learn how you can actively use this awareness to uproot injustice and inequality in the world -- and replace it with love. (This virtual interview, hosted by TED's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers and speaker development curator Cloe Shasha, was recorded June 9, 2020.) https://www.ted.com/talks/ibram_x_kendi_the_difference_between_being_not_racist_and_antiracist This video is shared under a Creative Commons…

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How Racial Bias Works and How to Disrupt It

Our brains create categories to make sense of the world, recognize patterns and make quick decisions. But this ability to categorize also exacts a heavy toll in the form of unconscious bias. In this powerful talk, psychologist Jennifer L. Eberhardt explores how our biases unfairly target Black people at all levels of society -- from schools and social media to policing and criminal justice -- and discusses how creating points of friction can help us actively interrupt and address this troubling problem. https://www.ted.com/talks/jennifer_l_eberhardt_how_racial_bias_works_and_how_to_disrupt_it

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How to Design Gender Bias Out of Your Workplace

Simple changes can give big results Equity expert Sara Sanford offers a certified playbook that helps companies go beyond good intentions, using a data-driven standard to actively counter unconscious bias and foster gender equity -- by changing how workplaces operate, not just how people think. https://www.ted.com/talks/sara_sanford_how_to_design_gender_bias_out_of_your_workplace This video is shared under a Creative Commons license (BY-NC-ND 4.0). Please visit Ted.com. This TED Talk originally took place at TEDxSeattle, an independent event. 

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Blind spots: Challenge assumptions

Our brains are wired to make assumptions, which can sometimes be off base. We think it's an honest mistake; science calls it a blind spot. This video was used with kind permission of PwC. June 23, 2017.

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Overcome stereotypes

Stereotypes can influence our perception of who's the "right fit." They may create a road block towards our destination. This video was used with kind permission of PwC. June 23, 2017.

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Broaden perspectives

It's natural to gravitate towards people who are like us. But making decisions solely on who we're comfortable with can cause tunnel vision. This video was used with kind permission of PwC. June 23, 2017.

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Biases and decision-making

From the things we say to the actions we take each day, our world- and that of business- is comprised of thousands of decisions, both big and small. How we come to make those decisions is the result of intuition and analysis and, in most cases, influenced by biases that we may or may not be aware of. We know about blind spots in decision making, mostly because of the work of ES collaborators Max Bazerman and Ann Tenbrunsel. A recent graph published in Business Insider: Australia, and included below, depicts additional biases that all would be wise to learn and attempt…

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16 cognitive biases that can kill your decision making

The purpose of this article is to discuss several key cognitive biases and their effects on decision making within strategic innovation management as well as how to minimize their effects so that team members can contribute optimally to the fuzzy innovation process. They are essential in understanding and managing appropriately to ensure your innovation outputs are most suitable to your challenges and problems identified, rather than being decided upon by instantaneous emotional instinct without objective reflection. By the end of this article, you will learn: How to identify key innovation related cognitive biases How to challenge them How to make…

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Conformity bias

Are you using your own judgment? Are you sure? Conformity bias refers to our tendency to take cues for proper behavior in most contexts from the actions of others rather than exercise our own independent judgment. This video shows how conformity bias works, and how to maintain independence in the face of the pressure to conform.

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Overconfidence bias

This video from Ethics Unwrapped introduces the idea of the "overconfidence bias." You may have heard that most drivers rate their driving skill as above-average. The idea also applies to acting ethically. The overconfidence bias is our tendency to be more confident in our ability to act ethically than is objectively justified by our abilities and moral character.

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